Brands on YouTube: Hits and Misses

Michelle Phan’s Wicked Red Riding Hood Look – She’s the 20th most subscribed to channel on YouTube

Viral videos are still largely a mystery. Why a South Korean music video has been viewed over half a BILLION times in less than 3 months is beyond me. It’s a catchy tune, yes. And the parodies have been oodles of fun. But over 500M times? I doubt anyone would have predicted that. Justin Bieber still reigns with his Baby video, which should reach 1 Billion views by the end of this year, but PSY is catching up in record time.

But while viral videos are often a one-hit wonder mystery (Chuck Testa, Double Rainbow Guy, Charlie Bit My Finger, etc) and are largely due to luck (funny/interesting/surprising content + right place + right time + slow news day), there is another realm of YouTube that has more predictable results: content channels.

Content channels are the YouTube producers that provide regular programming with deep, long-term engagement. They have loads of subscribers who tune into their videos on a daily or weekly basis, watching, commenting, liking and sharing videos on a consistent basis. And though some of these channels were jump-started by a single viral video, many of them were built over time by engaging their audience and following some well-publicized best practices on YouTube (highly recommended download).

Though these best practices, tips and tricks are readily available, I’ve been surprised to find that many brands that are dying to engage in the power of YouTube ignore or avoid this advice altogether, opting instead for big advertising spends and vanity plays. When I say vanity plays, I’m referring to the tendency for brands to invest more in branding than they do in long term engagement. A fully customized YouTube channel page, for instance, has a price: a major advertising investment (in the US, having a vanity page could cost you $200,000 ad spend + the cost of customizing the page). That’s a whole lot of money in lieu of engagement.

So, what are some of these best practices? They are pretty simple:

  1. Create great content that’s unique, compelling and engaging (informative or entertaining)
  2. Use the first 10 seconds of your video to grab attention: if you are posting a how-to video, show the results before you go into the spiel
  3. Post on a consistent basis: one video won’t do it, and uploading a whole whack of videos at once won’t do it either.
  4. Post fresh content on a regular basis: record, post, interact, get feedback, use that feedback to improve your next video. Repeat! The most powerful part of YouTube is the interaction. The best video bloggers listen to their audience and incorporate questions and requests regularly.
  5. Use great thumbnails (show the end result or the best snap of the video), tag well, title descriptively and use annotations and information to your advantage

THE HITS

For this analysis I’m focusing on beauty because there are MULTIPLE categories for multiple viewers on YouTube and beauty is not only one of my favorites, but the area in which I have spent most of my analysis. Music, comedy, travel and gaming are areas in which brands and independents are mixing quite well at the moment. Fashion and beauty are still laggards. And, for the purpose of analysis, I’ve chosen one ostensibly independent channel and two of the top brand channels (meaning that they are well-recognized beauty brands). I also rate by subscribers and not views. You can buy views, but subscribers come organically and are a good sign of engagement.

One of my favorite channels on YouTube is LuxyHair:

Though I’m pretty sure their bedrooms aren’t really that spotless, they do a lovely production job of mixing casual and professional. Mimi and Leyla are sweet and generous and friendly. The lighting is perfect. The setting (bedroom) is fun and casual, but lovely. The styles they do are timely (they watch the trends and the comments). And because of this, they have amazing engagement: nearly 600,000 subscribers and nearly 100 MILLION views on their videos. They also get oodles of comments and interactions (video replies, likes and messages).

And guess what? LuxyHair is a brand!

They’ve been posting videos and slowly improving since a few months before they launched their hair extensions line. They did it right. They started building a community and audience and providing value before they started posting any product at all. And even today, they rarely, if ever, talk directly about their hair extensions. Instead, they show us in the audience how to wear them and look amazing in various styles. Subtly, there is always a link in the comments to the extensions they’ve used in the style…you know…just in case I need to know.

I actually didn’t know that LuxyHair was a brand until I’d been subscribed for a few months. I found one of their hair tutorials as a related video and loved it so much, I subscribed to the channel. I kept watching the videos through my YouTube dashboard and one day Mimi mentioned something off hand about the extensions, so I clicked through and checked them out. I was impressed that they spent so much time building community and offering something for the viewers that I’m likely to order some extensions from them in the near future.

Another brand that does a pretty decent job is Mac Cosmetics:

Normally, I wouldn’t think much of their YouTube content as it’s sort of all over the map and much of it misses the mark on what I need to get from a beauty channel (personally, I could care less about backstage at FashionWeek), but their really short and snappy tips and tricks are pretty awesome. Like this tip for winged out eye makeup or this one on how to clean up the red pout. Their thumbnails, awful bad titles that aren’t descriptive and their general inability to focus drive me a bit nuts, but the content is there. It just needs to be cleaned up.

Plus, I can totally forgive them because they run a full-on integrated, love for the makeup artist community show through multiple platforms, including on their own site (but really? No sharable URLs? C’mon!). They obviously care and it shows. They just need some discipline. But whatever, they are artists. ;)

Mac Cosmetics looks to be the most subscribed to major beauty brand on YouTube, but one of my favorite social brands is catching up fast…Sephora:

Of course Sephora has the advantage that many beauty bloggers have: they have multiple lines of cosmetics to work with. However, they started late in the game and through using many of the YouTube best practices (regular, timely uploads; good thumbnails; great use of playlists; effective titling and tagging; etc), they are taking the beauty world on YouTube by storm. Just a snapshot comparison of Sephora, Mac Cosmetics and Luxy Hair shows that they are growing in leaps and bounds:

They are nowhere near LuxyHair, but are poised to overtake Mac in a few months as the reigning Queen of beauty brand YouTube. I should add, however, that some of the early growth was due to paid advertising, but they’ve used it pretty sparingly along the way and the majority of their channel growth is organic and due to their use of best practices, attention to details and community interaction. Like Mac, they also have a fully integrated social strategy and use Facebook, their own BeautyTalk community, Twitter, Pinterest, Tumblr, Instagram and mobile platforms. They interact regularly and produce helpful and fun content on all of their platforms. They also have a robust VIB (Very Important Beauty) program that rewards loyalty, a killer email marketing program, make their stores super DIY and have a really great website and ecommerce platform that makes it easy to search for products by brand, skin issue, categories, trends, specials and expert advice. It’s hard to compete with their focus on customer experience…but you should try.

THE MISSES

I originally had analyzed a few misses, but I’ve decided to make this a more general post because, well, it encompasses pretty much every beauty brand on YouTube. Sorry. By now, if you are reading this and you work for a beauty brand, you probably know who you are. Instead, let me point out what you are generally doing wrong.

You are making one or many or all of the following MISTAKES:

1. In a desperate attempt to ‘go viral’, you are paying for advertising to boost content that is best suited for a one-way medium (ie. an advertisement that has no story, emotion or interactiveness).

2. You are getting a bunch of tutorial videos professionally shot all at once so you can have plenty of content kicking around to upload over time.

3. You are spending a whole bunch of time and money getting your channel landing page branded beautifully (for those rare people that actually land on a channel homepage – less than 1% btw).

4. You are running short-term campaigns on YouTube with no long term planning or thought of how much a community would benefit your brand over the long run

5. You aren’t paying any attention to how people really discover your videos…through search, blogs, social networks and other sources where your thumbnails, descriptions and titles really really matter for discoverability.

All-in-all, you are sending the signal that you would rather spend a big sum of money than spend the time building real relationships and community around your brand. Spending money is fine, but it should support, not be in lieu of community building. I’ve watched many too many brands with short-term visions and I know that part of it is the way that advertising budgets are set out. But if you want to really benefit from social, you need to BE social. You need to look at it through a long-term lens and budget accordingly. Online doesn’t work like print worked. It doesn’t work like television or outdoor or radio or any of the previous one-way media worked for brands. Social is two-way….no multi-way conversation between you and your customers, your customers and your customers and your customers and your future customers. Hell it’s even a conversation between you and your competitors because even the most loyal customers use multiple brands and working WITH that fact will help you a great deal.

You need to think from a customers point of view. It’s not about you and how pretty or authoritative or polished your brand is. It’s about how you help make her feel. What does she need? What does she desire? I’ve said it before, and here I go again:

Social is about making your customers’ lives simpler, less confusing, less alienating, more efficient, more meaningful and just plain better.

It costs less money and more time. Instead of spending $200,000 on ads and $50,000 on a fancy brand channel page, spend that money on hiring great people who understand your customers and your brand (maybe even one of your biggest fans!) to build your community. It will cost you less in the short term and have way more benefits in the long term. Use YouTube best practices…learnt from those who have built strong, adoring, amazing communities of devoted viewers.

Everything is social now and your customers expect more from you now. You need to change your thinking if you want to succeed today. And believe me, you will look back and realize how wrong your approach was when you are spending little money on advertising and lots of time really interacting with your customers.

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Categories: community, eMarketing, marketing, social capital

Author:Tara Hunt

Strategist. Researcher. Interdisciplinarian. Founder, Lime Foundry + Buyosphere. Author, The Whuffie Factor. Speaker. Mother. Karaoke lover.

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5 Comments on “Brands on YouTube: Hits and Misses”

  1. October 24, 2012 at 15:45 #

    Brands & marketers handle YouTube the same way they handle the web, I don’t call it the “social web” anymore because thats just stupid.

    Marketers are still doing their best to apply traditional practices on social platforms by throwing huge amounts of money on the packaging while creating nothing of substance.

    Part of it is their fear or lack of gaging the client’s expectations but I also believe its mainly because the economics

    Brands want quick results, budgets have expiration dates, marketers want to spend the client’s budgets and want big results. This is why we end up with pretty YouTube brand pages that nobody cares about or comes back to because there isn’t any compelling content.

    As you said, look at what the makers are doing and how long they’ve been doing it. Want to reach that level of dedicated viewership by creating real engagement! Right now all they are doing is paying for Facebook fans…

  2. October 24, 2012 at 15:51 #

    Reblogged this on Carlos Pacheco and commented:

    Tara’s basically written down a lot of what I’m thinking right now working in the world of YouTube.

  3. October 24, 2012 at 20:42 #

    Great post as usual, Tara. It amazes me how long it’s taking so many brands to understand this stuff.

    The Gangnam Style song (the song, not the video) actually hasn’t sold particularly well in North America despite its catchiness. So at least in this part of the world it’s not about the song. It’s all about Psy’s dance moves, which are unique because he invented them (he did all the choreography himself). He says he’s been doing odd dance moves for 12 years, so this is actually the culmination of a long process.

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